Spotlight on rasagiline in Parkinson's disease
Oldfield V, Keating GM, Perry CM.
Wolters Kluwer Health | Adis, Auckland, New Zealand,
an editorial office of Wolters Kluwer Health,
Conshohocken, Pennsylvania, USA.
CNS Drugs. 2008;22(1):83-6.


Rasagiline (Azilect) is a novel, selective, irreversible second-generation inhibitor of monoamine oxidase type B (MAO-B). It is administered orally once daily and is approved in the US, Canada, Mexico, Israel and the EU for use as monotherapy and as adjunct therapy in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. Results of well designed clinical studies indicate that rasagiline is effective as initial monotherapy and improves Parkinson's symptomatology in patients with early Parkinson's disease. In addition, when administered in conjunction with levodopa, in patients with moderate to advanced disease and motor fluctuations, rasagiline reduces mean daily 'off' time and increases daily 'on' time without troublesome dyskinesias, compared with controls. Rasagiline is generally well tolerated as monotherapy and adjunctive therapy and is administered once daily. Thus, rasagiline, administered as a simple and convenient dosage regimen, is a well tolerated and effective option for monotherapy in patients with early Parkinson's disease and for adjunctive therapy in patients with moderate to advanced disease.

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Parkinson's disease: resources
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Rasagiline/Azilect: patient information leaflet (PDF)
Rasagiline (Azilect, Agilect) in early Parkinson's disease

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